Has Microsoft Gone Too Far ?

IIEvolution85II Jun 13, 2013

  1. IIEvolution85II

    IIEvolution85II Gamerscore Wreckage :) Gold Subscriber
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    After canceling roundtable interviews and press one-on-ones, Microsoft decided to send out a fact sheet detailing the policies and features that will govern its much maligned DRM. Sony was quick to jump on the chance to undermine DRM during their own press conference last night, while swearing off anything to do with always-online policies and restrictions on used games. Since Microsoft did not address these topics directly during their show Monday morning, Fate of the Game wouldn’t be serving its purpose if we didn’t provide gamers a clear purview into the rules and regulations Microsoft is planning to enforce on them.

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    Full Kinect Integration

    First off, let’s address the back and forth we have heard from various employees at Microsoft regarding whether or not the Kinect will be required for the system to function. At an event for the Xbox One reveal in May, Xbox UK marketing director Harvey Eagle had this to say on the subject, “Kinect does require to be connected to Xbox One in all cases, yes.” Microsoft explains in its fact sheet that even though the Kinect can’t be detached from the system, it will have full-function software controls.
    “If you don’t want the Kinect sensor on while playing games or enjoying your entertainment, you can pause Kinect,” the Microsoft fact sheet says. “To turn off your Xbox One, just say ‘Xbox Off.’ When the system is off, it’s only listening for the single voice command — ‘Xbox On,’ and you can even turn that feature off too. Some apps and games may require Kinect functionality to operate, so you’ll need to turn it back on for these experiences.”
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    The other issue many voices across the net have vehemently spoken out against are the obvious privacy concerns, and with the recent discovery of “Prism,” the NSA data collection hub, they are not unfounded. Microsoft pleads that the Kinect will not be used for personal data logging.
    “You are in control of what Kinect can see and hear,” the fact sheet says. “By design, you will determine how responsive and personalized your Xbox One is to you and your family during setup. The system will navigate you through key privacy options, like automatic or manual sign in, privacy settings, and clear notifications about how data is used. When Xbox One is on and you’re simply having a conversation in your living room, your conversation is not being recorded or uploaded.”
    Even still, just because Microsoft says it’s not collecting data doesn’t mean that what the Kinect sees and hears is entirely private. After all,even the most secure network protection can be breached – just ask Sony.

    Used Games Policy

    This policy is probably the most discussed and reviled of Microsoft’s new and improved hardware “features.” Microsoft insists that selling and trading games will still be possible but not without a few glaring caveats.
    “In our role as a game publisher, Microsoft Studios will enable you to give your games to friends or trade in your Xbox One games at participating retailers,” the fact sheet says. “Third-party publishers may opt in or out of supporting game resale and may set up business terms or transfer fees with retailers. Microsoft does not receive any compensation as part of this. In addition, third party publishers can enable you to give games to friends.
    “We designed Xbox One so game publishers can enable you to trade in your games at participating retailers. Microsoft does not charge a platform fee to retailers, publishers, or consumers for enabling transfer of these games.”
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    So Microsoft is deferring this one to the third-party publishers, apparently. Good thing EA would never dream of charging anyone for access to all of the content in a used game. Microsoft goes on to explain how multiple accounts on one system and gifting your copy of a game to friends or family will work.

    “Your friends and family, your guests and acquaintances get unlimited access to all of your games. Anyone can play your games on your console–regardless of whether you are logged in or their relationship to you,” the fact sheet says. “Xbox One is designed so game publishers can enable you to give your disc-based games to your friends. There are no fees charged as part of these transfers. There are two requirements: you can only give them to people who have been on your friends list for at least 30 days and each game can only be given once.”

    Anyone playing on your system, whether signed in to your account or not, will have access to your library, which is a good thing, but it should be an understood feature that does not require this much explanation. The “gift” policy is quite a bit more disconcerting. Once you have given your game to some one, they now own it, and it can’t be transferred back, or to any one else for that matter. What does that mean for renting or loaning games? The company did address this by saying, “We are exploring the possibilities with our partners.”
    Xbox One will grant up to 10 family members access to your account and games library. Similar to Xbox 360, “a family member can play your copy of Forza Motorsport at a friend’s house. Only now, they will see not just Forza, but all of your shared games. You can always play your games, and any one of your family members can be playing from your shared library at a given time.

    Internet Connection Required…Sometimes

    Microsoft has confirmed that the Xbox requires verification for apps and games once every 24 hours. This is definitely an issue for those who do not have access broadband internet. With no alternate way of verification, the Xbox One effectively locks out these users. Microsoft does make an attempt to clarify exactly why this is the case.
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    “Xbox One is designed to run in a low-powered, connected state,” the fact sheet says. “This means your system, games and apps are always current and ready to play—no more waiting for updates. While a persistent connection is not required, Xbox One is designed to verify if system, application or game updates are needed and to see if you have acquired new games, or resold, traded in, or given your game to a friend. Games that are designed to take advantage of the cloud may require a connection.”

    The company goes on to further explain how multiple system users will be able to access content: “With Xbox One you can game offline for up to 24 hours on your primary console, or one hour if you are logged on to a separate console accessing your library. Offline gaming is not possible after these prescribed times until you re-establish a connection, but you can still watch live TV and enjoy Blu-ray and DVD movies.”
    The Redmond-based silicon giant did make an attempt to detail the advantages of this, at least from a developer standpoint, stating, “because every Xbox One owner has a broadband connection, developers can create massive, persistent worlds that evolve even when you’re not playing.”

    The Truth (as I see it at least)

    Though Microsoft did finally show off some great software, has the release of this information soured gamers to the point of leaving the Xbox camp? Time will tell, but I do know that all of these restrictions and policies would give anyone in their right mind cause to be hesitant to purchase such a device.
    [​IMG]As someone who does a lot of gaming on PC, I am not foreign to the Idea of DRM and games as a license instead of physical ownership, but I believe the Xbox One is taking many of the aspects that the casual console gamer holds in high regard and throwing them out of the window – very puzzling, since those people are exactly whom Microsoft has been marketing to.

    At this point, if a friend or loved one asked, “Should I go with the Xbox One for my next gen gaming needs?” I would have to tell them that the PS4 is cheaper and has all the features you are used to, plus some interesting new ones. And if this person was dead set against Sony, well, the PC is always an option, and you can get pretty decent rig for around the same price as the Xbox One. Plus, games are for PC are ludicrously low priced on Steam.

    I am not saying I won’t get an Xbox One. I probably will. But with the console battle where it stands, PlayStation 4 definitely has a metric-****-ton of positive buzz and consumer momentum coming out of E3. Microsoft will be hard-pressed to get gamers back on their side leading up to the launch of the Xbox One, unless they have a few tricks up their sleeve.

    What do you think, is Sony poised to take back its place as the once and possible future king of the consoles, or does Microsoft have one more ace left to play (subsidies)?

    SOURCE Microsoft
     
  2. Fallen Predator

    Fallen Predator Lifetime Gold Lifetime Gold
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    HAHA, nice mate made my night, thanks for the info.
     
  3. IIEvolution85II

    IIEvolution85II Gamerscore Wreckage :) Gold Subscriber
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    Yeah made mine too lol but MS have shot themselves in the foot this time i think ;)
     
  4. Fallen Predator

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    yea they have don't think they can get them self's out of this one, unless they change all of it, but i highly doubt it, money hungry.
     

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